Monday, December 21, 2009

Think You Might be Hypermobile? Take these Tests Below!

TOP 5 HMS SYMPTOMS

1) Increased Flexibility – ‘double-jointedness,’ majority of joints extend past 180 degrees
2) Skin – extra soft, silky-smooth skin that is very thin, easily bruises and is slow to heal, scarring that is characteristically smoother in texture and lighter in color than surrounding skin
3) Frequent Injury – accident prone and clumsy, due to decreased proprioception (the body’s sense of its own movement through 3D space)
4) Anesthesia Problems – anesthetics (such as novicaine and lignocaine) take longer to take affect and ware off faster than normal
5) Joint Pain – frequent joint pain which does not respond to typical treatments such as ice, rest and anti-inflammatory medication, can be brought about suddenly without any direct injury or trauma and lasts longer than normal muscle inflammation

- If these symptoms sound familiar, it may be worth investigating Hypermobility Syndrome as a possible diagnosis to help explain your medical problems. Below you will find the Beigton Test and Brighton Criteria, the two medical tests used along with family history and certain exclusionary exams (such as Xrays, MRIs and blood work) in diagnosing HMS. First, use the Beighton Test to see if you have Generalized Joint Hypermobility, the primary symptom of HMS, which can be determined by a score of 4/9 or higher. Then, use the Brighton Criteria to asses whether or not HMS is the likely cause of this characteristic increased joint flexibility. Since HMS is a genetic disorder, it may be beneficial to have other family members perform these tests, or to at least have an accurate and detailed family health history at hand. If the Beigton Test and Brighton Criteria indicate that HMS is likely, it may be beneficial to talk to your doctor about Hypermobility Syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos.

*Arthralgia = joint pain

11 comments:

  1. The only 'symptom' I have trouble with is the smooth skin.. I personally havn't really stroked many other people so am not sure how smooth my skin is! Unless I can base it on not needing to moisturise apart from legs which are affected by eczema due to shaving...

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    1. This is one that I never thought about at all until I got the diagnosis and started reading. I just thought I lucked out. However, after reading that that is a symptom, I thought about all the times over the years that boyfriends and friends remarked, quite enthusiastically, on the unusual smoothness of my skin (and apart from my face, elbows, and hands, I don't really moisturize regularly). It's one of those things you may or may not notice.

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  2. I'm hypermobile and so is my mum and brother we are all very flexible but although i can do the most flexibility wise my brother has it the worst. I am also a dancer and being 'naturally flexible' helps me with that as well.

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  3. Well, this post would be of great help to anyone who would come to read this one. Thanks a lot for sharing your thoughts. Damiana

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  4. from the top picture the only one i cant do is touch the floor without bending my kneees but that could be because a. im fat and b. my knees go so far backwards when i straighten my legs it hurts too much

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  5. I scored 7 and googled this because MY JOINTS REALLY HURT

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  6. ... Oh god. I scored a nine. My joints don't hurt, but I've been wondering about me flexibility and I've been getting hurt more lately (sprained ankle, broken arm, etc.), and now I'm a bit worried. D:

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  7. I scored about a 5 (not including my legs, as I can't really tell if my legs bend enough to be considered). I can do both my elbows, both thumbs and easily touch the floor, however, I was wondering if being able to touch your elbows behind your back is also be considered, because I am also able to touch my elbows behind my back. Also when I was younger I used to always dislocate my shoulder, and once dislocated my elbow, I also bruise easily and sometimes experience achy pains in my upper back/shoulders and my hips, and also my wrists and fingers.

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  8. I scored a 6. elbows thumbs and pinkies

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  9. Hi I have scored from a 3 to a 9 with different consultants and getting really fed up of my gp telling me to deal with it and its got so bad I am now contact professors in the states as well as here to get help as no one seems to understand how it feels .

    alexelle

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  10. Hi, could shoulders and other leg symptoms be considered? If I put my arm up my back from below, I can pat the bottom of my head. Down from the top, I hit below my bra. If I lie on my front, my legs rest flat and comfortable on my butt and my feet rest on my back (I never knew this wasn't normal!)I have both thumb symptoms,a LOT of the minor criteria, get horrific random pain in my joints and my shoulders, hips and collarbones sublux and semi-dislocate every day. I'm also pretty tall and I've always been skinny. Could I have hypermobility without the elbow and knee symptoms? Thanks x

    P.S I'm embarrassingly clumsy because of my long limbs. I never know where they are!

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